EZRA POUND AND FENOLLOSA

Perhaps inspired by Pound's public engagement with Japanese themes, Ernest Fenollosa's newly-widowed wife made arrangements in late 1913 to send the orientalist's unpublished scholarly papers to Pound.


Ernest Fenollosa. "Translation of Chinese classics including poetry," v. 1 of 2. A. MS. line-by-line translation of poems by Rihaku (Li Po) transliterated by his Japanese teachers Mori and Ariga. Tokyo, ca. 1900.

Translation of Chinese classics including poetry


Ezra Pound. Cathay: For the Most Part from the Chinese of Rihaku, from the notes of the late Ernest Fenollosa, and the Decipherings of the Professors Mori and Ariga. London: Elkin Mathews, 1915.

Cathay: For the Most Part from the Chinese of Rihaku, from the notes of the late Ernest Fenollosa, and the Decipherings of the Professors Mori and Ariga

Upon receiving Fenollosa's scholarly papers, Pound poeticized a number of Fenollosa's line-by-line translations of the works of Chinese poet Li Po (Rihaku in Japanese), publishing the result as the much-noted volume Cathay.


James Legge, translator. The Book of Poetry (Shih Ching). Copy owned and annotated by Ezra Pound. Shanghai: Chinese Book Co., 1903.

The Book of Poetry

Pound began to teach himself Chinese and by 1940 Chinese characters and ideas took a central place in the text of his Cantos.


Ezra Pound. "Canto LXXIV," part of The Pisan Cantos, with a "note to base censor" that the ideograms contained nothing seditious. T.MS. with autograph corrections and ideograms. Pisa, 1945.

Canto LXXIV


The Twentieth Century: American Modernists:
H.D., Amy Lowell and John Gould Fletcher
Katherine Anne Porter and Arthur Davison Ficke
Witter Bynner
Wallace Stevens
Eastern Themes and Modernist Theater; Eugene O'Neill
Thornton Wilder
William Carlos Williams and Marianne Moore
E.E. Cummings and Gertrude Stein

Exhibition Introduction

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