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Introduction Utopian Literature Dystopian Literature Utopian Communities
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BROOK FARM
The founder of Brook Farm, George Ripley (1802-1880), was one of Unitarianism’s most promising ministers, and the farm at West Roxbury, Massachusetts began as a product of the transcendentalist movement and a showplace for Christian socialism. The commune had more than 120 members at its highest point and was widely regarded as an intellectual center. After four years of existence, however, the members changed its purpose to that of a Fourierist phalanx.

 
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Harbinger

The Harbinger. New York, N.Y. : Burgess, Stringer and Co. ; Boston, Mass.: Redding and Co., Vol. 1, No. 1, Saturday, June 14, 1845.

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The Harbinger
When the headquarters of Fourierism moved from New York City to Brook Farm in 1845, the Fourierist Magazine, the Phalanx, was renamed the Harbinger to be published on the Brook Farm printing press. The magazine soon became one of the outstanding periodicals for recording the intellectual events of that day.

On the left, an article labeled “Associations” reprinted from the Ohio State Journal announces an increase in phalanxes modeled on Fourier’s principles in the growing “movement for the reorganization of society.”

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